Category Archives: life in general

Retrospective 2012

Wow. It’s been nearly 2 years since my last meaningful post. It’s also the perfect time to do the end-of-the-year retrospective.

All mistakes I have made considered, I realized 3 things about myself:

  1. Advancement in career and money/spending power are what drive me.
  2. BUT I don’t want to take the boards. Yet. Any time soon. I don’t feel learned nor mature enough to deserve the license.
  3. Permanent and binding commitments to people scare me. I am willing to hurt myself to be my own master.
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The (Career) Story So Far

The Bible of catalogues for museum design. The drawing on yellow tracing is just an option I contributed to a pool of design schemes for a facade in the province.

I have been working for five months already.  I started working in my classmate’s mother’s firm not too long after my application stint with ASYA. The  factors in my decision making were

  1. Transportation / Location – The firm’s located in Pasong Tamo, a very convenient location.  It’s a 15 minute speed-walk and a jeep ride to Greenbelt, where I get picked up by my parents. Or two jeep rides if I’m lazy.
  2. Size of the firm – Small enough so that I don’t end up as another cog in the system.  Small enough so I get to see a project from conceptualization to construction.
  3. Work hours – NO WORK ON SATURDAYS!
  4. My boss’ program – My boss said that it was her personal goal to teach her apprentices how to start up and run a firm properly.  She said she had a hard time setting up her own firm and wished to impart the knowledge that she learned during this period so that her apprentices don’t repeat these mistakes.

To date,  I am part of a team working on a museum which will be located in a new high-rise building in Rockwell.  The team is basically involved with the space planning of the exhibit areas and the conservation center–which I find more interesting.  In addition, there are the sub-jobs of space planning: coordinating with the team designing the building and the Museum group, product research, and more research.  I knew early on that I lacked training to be a professional 3D renderer; so I am fortunate that I landed a space planning project instead.  The output is much harder to produce, not as pretty as making presentation drawings on 3Ds Max, but just as fulfilling.

My desk during a 10 minute break

The novelty of finally generating my own spending capacity that exceeds what I had with my college allowance has long worn off.  Interestingly, it made me more stingy.  I have no complaints about my current set-up.  Maybe, save for one: College life allowed me more impulsive moments.


The 3.5 Year Bucket List

1.   A new gadget

I think it’s high time I got a decent smartphone.  I was aspiring for a Blackberry at first but I realized I prioritized a large screen over anything else.  My most ambitious choice would be the Samsung Galaxy S II.

(Source)

2.   Learn the basics of Parkour

I almost accomplished this one.  I was supposed to attend a basic workshop this coming October with my two siblings.  But the training schedule would not permit us to do so.  In addition, my parents suggested that one of my siblings get physically fit first before the three of us could train together.

My wanting to learn this for AGES is probably an offshoot of my climbing over objects and on trees as a child.

(Source)

3.   Diversify my sources of income

I don’t want to rely purely on direct income.  Interesting enough, I thought I’d spend my very first paycheck on material wants.  But after looking at the the check, I suddenly got stingy.  At my level, the most that I could do is open a time deposit account.

(Source)

4.   Pass the Architecture Board Exam

(Source)

5.   Become a proficient marksman

This is Guo Wenjun, an Olympic shooter from Beijing.  I don’t want to reach that level but I want to be able to defend myself should there be a zombie apocalypse.  Haha!


Callback

I had to return to a prospective employer for my fourth and final interview with the Big Boss.  I was asked the night before to bring more of my sample works/portfolio.  Since I never had any time to compile any of works into a formatted portfolio.  I brought my thesis boards instead.

Me :: I would like to present my thesis, which is a Technical Vocational School–

Boss :: *Motions for me to stop, turns to his assistant (1 of 4 assistants in the room)* Tawagan mo nga yung expert natin na pumunta dito sa conference room. Si… si… yung galing UK.  (Call our expert to come down to the conference room. The one from the UK.)

Assistant # 1 :: *rushes out of conference room*

Assistant # 2 :: *rushes out of conference room, makes a phone call at the reception*

Assistant # 1 :: *comes back in* Sir, nagbreak po siya. (Sir, he’s on break.)

Boss :: *pause* Sige. *Turns back and motions for me to continue*

Me :: *inward sigh of relief*

That rattled me for a moment.  Anyway, HR emailed me later that night the job offer to join the firm.  I decided not to accept since commuting there would also be especially difficult.  Maybe I would eventually adapt to a hard routine.  I can’t help but wonder how it would be like to work for the Boss.  Personally, I was impressed when I saw the office set-up.  The operations–well, at least those visible to me that time–were running like a well-oiled machine.


Graduation

April 17, 2011.  Well, it all has to end at some point. :)

(Photo credits to my Dad and Myel Quianzon.)

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How to Rush Bookbind Your Thesis, Amazing Race Style

My college experience would not be complete without embarking on one last crazy adventure/fieldtrip…

MISSION: Have thesis book-bound before March 24. Avoid going to Recto at all costs. Jam and I are hopeless at exploring unknown places, and I seriously doubted that Myel could efficiently navigate the area by herself.

[Myel, what I meant was that we could not help you navigate because Jam and I don’t know the areas at all! :) ]

ROUTE: Kebs! Bahala na or To hell with it!

DATE: March 23, 2011

TIME: 15:00

TEAM MEMBERS: Jam, Myel, and I

STEP 1

From school, we took a taxi to Teachers Village to drop of my laptop.

We received a common tip from several sources that there were “a lot” of shops in Project 7 that did rush book binding jobs.  Exactly where those shops were, we didn’t know.

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In Memoriam

Life catches you unawares. A batchmate from Woodrose just died a few hours ago due to viral pneumonia.  It was an unknown strain, and from what I have been told, the doctors could not find a cure.  No one was expecting it.  We weren’t close but wow… At this point in my life, I’m expecting that everyone from high school and college is busy moving forward in career, love, and life.  Then someone who I spent 11 years of school and practically grew up with is suddenly gone.

I don’t think it’s fair.  God has his reasons for calling you early.  Rest in peace, Michele Joson.

(She’s the girl in the center)


Christmas Parties 2010/Transition

Thoroughly enjoyed the last two days. I have always had mixed feelings towards Christmas parties.  They signify the end of the year, a reminder of how people around me have grown up and grown older, a reminder of how everything is simply in flux.  Despite the convenience that Facebook provides when it comes to keeping in touch, it is a whole different perspective when you come into physical contact with these people on a regular basis.  (I am TERRIBLE at keeping in touch through the Internet or text.) Coming from a high school and elementary barkada that has been together for 10 years, and still maintained close connections–yes, even the annual set of birthday celebrations–well…  I fear that without a common “meeting place” (i.e. school, G.E. subjects, my friends’ apartment) people will simply grow apart, the online interaction will cease, and individual people become just another online status.  Personally, I don’t want to be reminded that separation is only a few months away.


Schaum’s outlines/Moving on…

(and the bi-annual post-sem review)

The Schaum’s Outlines Calculus textbook and workbook saved my brain from getting fried by Calculus.  I ended up enjoying Math 54 because of it.  Too bad I did not get these books when I was taking the prerequisite subject.  I would have gotten a better grade and wasted less time.

And just when I am about to finish–hopefully–all of my structurals series, I find these.  Idiot.  How I WISH I had these for the past four semesters.

Right now, I am waiting for my grades to be posted in the CRS website.  I don’t recall ever having fully relaxed during the first week of the semestral break because of the waiting.  I think the most agonizing school years/semesters were when I was still taking my basic Math and Physics subjects.  The CRS was in its early development stages.  Professors simply posted the final or pre-final standing outside their offices.  So, one can imagine the anxiety and inconvenience of having to go back and forth to check if the grades were actually posted.

My current anxiety is my second to the last structurals subject.  The last one, I’m even surprised I passed.

I’m still waiting for the “GO!” signal for me to proceed to my last semester.  I’m amazed I got through 5.5 years of college.  Personally, I do not even consider myself remotely intelligent as I have very poor retention skills.  I have to go over a lot of my lessons repeatedly just to retain a fraction if it–think Dory from “Finding Nemo”.  Haha!  It’s funny because I know I did more than the minimum requirement; repetitive study did pay off; my grades are generally above the passing mark but I still hate the results.  I don’t even like 90% of my design plates throughout my entire college stay.

Anyway, moving on.


When Teacher is a Dunce

Today, my youngest brother’s yaya asked me to help him with his project.  He was supposed to submit a research paper about the different organ systems in the human body.  The content had been taken care of–not by me–earlier.  The only thing that I had to do was to illustrate the following major organ systems, circulatory, muscular and skeletal, nervous, digestive, and respiratory system–accurately.  Exactly HOW does the teacher expect a Grade 5 student to draw the organ systems?  I thought I misheard but the yaya called the yayas of the other students.  All the other students asked either their parents or their older siblings to draw the organ systems for their research parents.

What idiocy.  How does their teacher expect his students to know what the organ systems look like if he requires their students to draw them at home?  Doing  the content for the research paper was so time-consuming because a format was not even given, only guide questions.  Consequently, the students end up submitting a “chop suey” paper and not learning how to gather and synthesize information in a systematic manner.  I also forgot to add that all the work for the content is relegated to the last minute because the students spend so much time trying to draw said organ systems or waiting for their parents or elder siblings to finish the illustrations.

I experienced this too so many years ago.  In elementary, my teachers placed so much emphasis on presentation rather than content.  The higher grade was given to the student’s work with the prettier cover page.  They should have just renamed the activity to Research Paper/Book Report Cover Making 101 and spared me the trouble of putting together actual content.

If the teacher really wanted his students to visually memorize the organ systems, he should have required them to download diagrams from the Internet, study them, and asked them to draw them in a supervised classroom activity.  Or he could have also given the students a standardized set of diagrams about these systems for the students to memorize.  It is disheartening and frustrating to know that this certain school hires inadequate teachers, and has a curriculum slant towards the Humanities and religion—I’m not basing my claim on this story alone—in spite of its exorbitant tuition fees.

After my less than polite tirade about the idiocy my brother’s science teacher and the inadequacy of his school’s education system, I conceded to drawing the organ systems anyway.  (He was lucky to catch me this time because I live away from home on weekdays.) Maybe I should consider giving my brother drawing lessons as well…